The Erroneous Basis of base_convert()

29 01 2016

July

July (Photo credit: kurafire)

Some bugs linger from one version of PHP to the next, such as the one associated with base_convert() and other base conversion functions. It has existed at least since the long, gone days of PHP 4. It even managed to escape the notice of Eevee in his encyclopedic rant railing against PHP a few years ago. An understandable oversight, given that nowadays developers usually apply themselves to other endeavors than converting values from one base to another. Read the rest of this entry »





Integers and Relativity in PHP

12 03 2013

What is universally true about integers in PHP is that they constitute whole numbers and their representations include a range of formats, such as hexadecimal, decimal, octal and even binary since PHP5.4. Surprisingly, Read the rest of this entry »





Numbers, Strings and Other Things

30 10 2010

At one of my latest interviews recently, the interviewers posed the following technical question: Read the rest of this entry »





Shuffling and Random Thoughts

28 10 2010

A riffle shuffle being performed during a game...

A riffle shuffle being performed during a game of poker at a bar near Madison, Wisconsin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sometimes you need to shuffle things when you work with PHP, that is to order a set of values where each appears in a randomized order. Read the rest of this entry »





Maximum Value

29 08 2010

Sometimes you may wish to use PHP to do something as simple as finding the maximum numeric value in an array. Read the rest of this entry »





Views and PHP: Part III

17 08 2010

The previous two parts were basically a set up for the drama that shall shortly enfold involving PHP and MySQ with respect to generating a brief revenue report. Read the rest of this entry »





Prime Time

12 08 2010

Yesterday, I read somewhere online that there are programmers with such poor programming skills that they are unable to write code that would display prime numbers between zero and a hundred. Read the rest of this entry »








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